In Memoriam

This is a list of people who are currently being considered for inclusion in the Sasquan In Memoriam list.  The list begins on the date of publication cut-off for the Loncon 3 Souvenir Book and contains names which appeared during the In Memoriam crawl at the Loncon Hugo Award Ceremony.


The Souvenir Book and Hugo Scroll have been finalized for this year and any further names should be submitted to next year’s Worldcon, MidAmeriCon II.

Current List

As of 8/1/2015

2014

Fan Rick Brooks (b.1941) died on May 19. Brooks was active in fandom throughout his life and in the 1990s published several stories in fanzines such as Keen and Startling Science Stories.

Ken Brown (b.circa 1957) died on May 19. Brown was a long-time reviewer for Interzone, beginning with issue 19 in 1987 and continuing through 1998. During that time, Brown also contributed non-fiction essays to the magazine and occasionally had review appear in Foundation.

Bay area fan Mike Farren (b.1949) died on May 22. In the 1980s, Farren served as Chair for The Elves’, Gnomes’ and Little Men’s Science Fiction, Chowder, and Marching Society. Farren also ran a FidoNet computer Bulletin Board System called Sci-Fido that focused on science fiction and fannish interests.

Author Jay Lake (b.1964) died on June 1, five days shy of his 50th birthday. Lake began publishing in 2001 and won the John W. Campbell Award in 2004. He has published numerous collections of his stories, beginning with Greetings from Lake Wu, and has written novels in three different series as well as a couple of stand-alone novels. In recent years, Lake’s fictional output has been less due to a very public battle with cancer, which he has often blogged about with openness and humor.

Fan Susan Kahn (b.1960) died on June 9. Kahn ran many registration desks for Lunacon and was also a pediatrician. Kahn has been battling pancreatic cancer.

South African author Dan Jacobson (b.1929) died on June 12. Jacobson was the author of the dystopian novel The Confessions of Joseph Baisz, the post apocalyptic Her Story, and the alternate history The God-Fearer.

Author Daniel Keyes (b.1927) died on June 15. Keyes was the author of the Hugo Award-winning short story “Flowers for Algernon,” which was expanded to the Nebula Award winning novel of the same title and made into the film Charly. In addition to his career as an author and teacher, Keyes served as editor of Marvel Science Fiction in 1951, just before he began selling his own stories. In 2000, the same year he published his memoir, Algernon, Charlie and I: A Writer’s Journey, he was named Author Emeritus by SFWA.

Australian author Pip Maddern (b.Philippa Maddern 1952) died on June 16. Maddern published thirteen short stories between 1976 and 1995, beginning with “The Ins and Outs of the Hadhya City-State.” She mostly retired from writing science fiction for a career in academia in 1990, although her final short story, “Not with Love,” appeared in 1995. All of her fiction was published in Australia. In addition, she had a Ph.D. in History and published Violence and Social Order: East Anglia 1422-1442.

Fan William C. Martin (b.1924) died on June 22. Martin was a member of First Fandom, joining fandom around 1934, and maintained a fantastic collection of science fiction, fantasy, and horror books and space toys. He was also a member of the Science Fiction Research Association.

Author Nancy Garden (b.1938) died on June 24. Garden received the 2003 Margaret Edwards Award for lifetime achievement and the Lambda Literary Award. Some of her novels from the early 1970s included Vampires, Werewolves, and Witches. She later wrote Prisoner of Vampires, My Brother, the Werewolf, and My Sister, the Vampire.

Michigan fan Kathleen Conat (b.c.1950) died on June 25. Conat was active in Michigan fandom, as were her sons, and she wrote numerous reviews over the years.

Author and composer Mary Rodgers (b.1931) died on June 26. Rodgers was the daughter of composer Richard Rodgers and was also a composer in her own right, having written the music for the Broadway show Once Upon a Mattress. In addition to her work on and off Broadway, Rodgers also wrote children’s books, including the novel Freaky Friday.

Author Jory Sherman (b.1932) died on June 28. Although best known for writing Westerns, Sherman also wrote seven novels in the Chill series of horror novels, beginning in 1978 with Satan’s Seed and continuing through Shadows, published in 1980. During that time, he also published the horror novel The Reincarnation of Jenny James.

British fan Richard Vine (b.1959) died on June 29. Vine worked on the first three Unicons as well as Conspiracy ’87, the World Con. Vine lived in Sweden since the 1990s.

Author Frank M. Robinson (b.1926) died on June 30. Robinson wrote several novels with Tom Scortia, including The Glass Inferno, which was the basis for the film The Towering Inferno. They also wrote The Prometheus Crisis, The Nightmare Factor, and Blow-Out!. Robinson also wrote the solo novels The Dark Beyond the Stars, Waiting, and The Donor. In 1999, he published Science Fiction of the 20th Century: An Illustrated History and recently finished his autobiography. In addition to his genre work, Robinson was a speechwriter for San Francisco politician Harvey Milk in the 1970s and appeared in a cameo role in the film Milk.

Author Walter Dean Myers (b.1937) died on July 1. Myers wrote numerous young adult novels, many of them dealing with the African-American experience, but his novel Brainstorm is science fiction.

NASA scientist Frederick I. Ordway III (b.1927) died on July 1. Ordward was a member of the American Rocket Society from 1939 until his death and wrote more than thirty books on rocketry. He worked as a scientific consultant on the film 2001: a space odyssey.

Author C. J. Henderson (b.1951) died on July 4 after a lengthy battle with cancer. Henderson was the author of Brooklyn Knight and Central Park Knight as well as comics for Marvel, Eternity, Tekno Comix, and Valiant.

Author Curt Gentry (b.1931) died on July 10. Gentry wrote The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California, about a future in which California had sunk into the ocean. He also wrote the crime novel Helter Skelter about Charles Manson.

Actor James Mathers (b.1936) died on July 11. Mathers appeared in SpaceDisco One, SeaQuest 2032, Doctor Jekyll’s Dungeon of Death, and The Right Stuff.

Author Thomas Berger (b.1924) died on July 13. Berger is best known for the novel Little Big Man, but also wrote Adventures of the Artificial Woman about androids and Vital Parts about cryonics.

South African author Nadine Gordimer (b.1923) died on July 13. Gordimer was mostly known for her mainstream fiction, but wrote the science fiction novel July’s People as well as a handful of genre short stories. She was award the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991.

British author J. T. Edson (b.1928) died on July 17. Edson mostly wrote American Westerns, but also wrote the Tarzan-inspired Bunduki novels.

Fan Roger K. Clendening II (b.1970) died on July 23 following open heart surgery. Clendening was active in filk and wrote science fiction and poetry, self-publishing many of which works through his Triviot Press imprint.

Author Lawrence Santoro (b.1942) died on July 25 following a bout with cancer. Santoro was the producers of the podcast Tales to Terrify and the author of numerous short stories, many of which were collected into Drink for the Thirst to Come in 2011. Santoro was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award twice.

Author Margot Adler (b.1946) died on July 28. Adler attended Clarion and wrote Vampires Are Us. She created the talk show Hour of the Wolf in 1972, which is still on the air and hosted by Jim Freund.

Author Dorothy Salisbury (b.1916) died on August 3. Salisbury was best known for her mysteries, but she dabbled in science fiction short stories, writing “A Matter of Public Notice” and “Emily’s Time.” Salisbury was one of the founders of Sisters in Crime and was named a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers Association in 1995.

Author Chapman Pincher (b.1914) died on August 5. Pincher was best known as a journalist, but he wrote the science fiction novel Not with a Bang. Many of his espionage novels have elements of science fiction in them.

Actor Robin Williams (b.1951) committed suicide on August 11. Williams got his first break playing the alien Mork on an episode of Happy Days, which was spun off to become Mork and Mindy. Over the years, Williams branched out from comedy to appear in several dramatic roles, including an Oscar for his role in Good Will Hunting and an Oscar nomination for his role in Terry Gilliam’s Arthurian-based The Fisher King. Other genre roles include the genie in Disney’s Aladdin, Jumanji, Theodore Roosevelt in The Night in the Museum franchise, and a robot in Bicentennial Man.

Filker Bari Greenberg died on August 17. Greenberg was a St. Louis songwriter and a performer who reached out to many newcomers, introducing them to filk and mentoring younger filkers. He was active in the band The Unusual Suspects and served as co-chair for Archon’s filk program. Greenberg was married to author and filker Cat Greenberg.

Brazilian comic writer Deodato Borges (b.1934) died on August 25. Borges created the radio show The Adventures of Flame and oversaw the character’s transition to comic books, which Borges wrote and drew. He also worked on 3000 Years Later. He often worked with his son, Mike Deodato. Borges has been scheduled to be a guest of honor at the Brazil Comic Con.

Musician Joe Bethancourt (b.1946) died on August 28. A professional musician, he worked as a session man in LA during the 1960s before moving to Arizona, where he had a lengthy career. He helped found the Arizona chapter of the SCA and performed under the name “Master Ioseph of Locksley.” Bethancourt was a musical guest of honor at Fencon VIII and was inducted into the Arizona Music & Entertainment Hall of Fame in 2013.

Italian publisher Gianfranco Viviani (b.1937) died on August 29. In 1970, Viviani founded Editrice Nord, a publishing house which has published numerous American science fiction novels in translation as well as original Italian science fiction.

Agent Kirby McCauley (b.1948) died on August 30. McCauley represented George R. R. Martin, Roger Zelazny, Stephen King, and many other successful authors. In addition to working as an agent, he was an anthologist and won the World Fantasy Award for editing Dark Forces. In 1975, McCauley chaired the first World Fantasy Convention.

Author Graham Joyce (b.1954) died on September 9. Joyce won his first British Fantasy Award in 1993 for Dark Sister and went on to win several more, as well as World Fantasy Awards. His other works included The Facts of Life, The Limits of Enchantment, and The Year of the Ladybird. Joyce was diagnoses with lymphoma last year.

Fan Randy Brunk (b.1955) committed suicide on September 23. Brunk served as President of the University of Maryland Science Fiction Society in the late 1970s and later was a member of the Potomac River Science Fiction Society, although his fanac waxed and waned over the years. He was an avid Gene Wolfe fan.

Author Hugh C. Rae (b.1935) died on September 24. Rae was the author of Harkfast, The Traveling Soul, and The Haunting at Waverley Falls. Rae also wrote historical romances using the pseudonym Jessica Stirling.

Nebula Award winning author Eugie Foster (b.1971) died on September 27 following a battle with cancer. Foster’s work was collected in Returning My Sister’s Face and Other Far Eastern Tales of Whimsy and Malice and she won the 2009 Nebula Award for “Sinner, Baker, Fabulist, Priest; Red Mask, Black Mask, Gentleman, Beast.” She had served as managing editor for Tangent Online and The Fix, both short story review sites, as well as editor of The Daily Dragon, the Dragoncon online newsletter.

Canadian fan Ann Methe died on October 5 following a battle with cancer. Methe was a Canadian con-runner who chaired Con*Cept Boreal in 1998 and won the Aurora Award for fannish achievement in 1999, as well as being nominated for the award in 1998 and 2000. She was married to artist Jean-Pierre Normand.

Author Zilpha Keatley Snyder (b.1927) died on October 7. Snyder won three Newbery Honor medals for her novels The Egypt Game, The Headless Cupid, and The Witches of Worm.

Italian comic book artist Giorgio Rebuffi (b.1928) died on October 15. Rebuffi created the superhero Tiramolla and updated the characters Cucciolo and Beppe. In addition, he drew Disney cartoons for Mondadori.

Brazilian comic artist André Coelho (b.1979) died in mid-October. Coelho has done work for both DC and Marvel, drawing Suicide Squad, Secret Origins, and Flash for DC and X-Men and Ms Marvel for Marvel.

Fan Vijay deSelby-Bowen (b.Velma J. Bowen) died on October 18 following a lengthy battle with cancer. Vijay entered fandom in 1982 and was the 1999 TAFF delegate, following in the footsteps of her cousin, Elliott Shorter. She served as secretary of the Lunarians and helped run Lunacon. She eventually moved to Seattle with her long-time companion Soren “Scraps” deSelby.

Author John Hayden Howard (b.1925) died on October 23. Howard wrote science fiction under the name Hayden Howard, publishing the novel The Eskimo Invasion, which was nominated for the Nebula Award, as well as several short stories.

British fan Helen Eling (b.1937) died on October 26. Eling was active in the Birmingham SF Group and served on several Eastercon and Novacon committes.

Romanian editor Stefan Ghidoveanu (b.1955) died on October 27. In 1990, Ghidoveanu left his career as an economist and began translating science fiction and producing Romanian SF radio shows as Explorers of the World of Tomorrow. He also arranged for Romanian publication of authors including Ursula K. Le Guin, John Scalzi, Roger Zelazny, and Walter Jon Williams.

British fan Ian Bambro died on November 1. Bambro published the fanzine Somewhere Before.

Belgian author Michel Parry (b.1947) died on November 1. Parry wrote the novels Countess Dracula, Chariots of Fire, and Throne of Fire, the last two in collaboration with Garry Rusoff. He also edited several anthologies, including the From the Archives of Evil and Mayflower Books of Black Magic Stories series.

Fan Dave Rike (b.1935) died on November 1, 2014. Rike became active in fandom in the 1950s, co-editing the fanzine Innuendo, with Terry Carr and, along with Carr, created the hoax fan Carl Brandon. He helped popularize the propeller beanie as a symbol of fandom and also worked on The Incompleat Burbee. A life-long Bay area fan, helped build the original Bheer Can Tower to the Moon.

Brazilian author André Carneiro (b.1922) died on November 4. Carneiro published the collection Diário da nave perdida in 1963. His novels included Amorquia and Piscina Livre. In 1967, he authored the non-fiction Introdução ao Estudo da “Science Fiction”.

George Slusser (b.1939) died on November 4. Slusser was a co-founder and Curator Emeritus of The J. Lloyd Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy Literature. His own writing included Robert A. Heinlein: Stranger in His Own Land, The Farthest Shores of Ursula K. Le Guin, and Nursery Realms: Children in the Worlds of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror among others. In 1986, he was the recipient of the Pilgrim Award from the Science Fiction Research Association.

Karen Jones died on November 8. Jones worked as a freelance User Interface Designer and also served as the Art Director for Lightspeed. She has also worked in photography, vector-based art, and character design for video games.

Author R. A. Montgomery (b.1936) died on November 9. Montgomery was instrumental in the Choose Your Own Adventure books that were popular in the late 1970s and 1980s.

Author J. F. Gonzalez (b.1964) died on November 10. Gonzalez published fifteen novels, beginning with Clickers, published in 1999 and co-written with Mark Williams, a series he would return to twice more with Brian Keene, with whom he wrote several works. In the 1990s, he edited issues of Phantasm and Iniguities and he edited the anthology Tooth and Claw in 2002. His stories have been collected in four collections and various chapbooks.

Author Alan Lickiss died on November 10. Lickiss began publishing science fiction in 1996 when his story “Martian Invaders Meet Mom,” co-written with his wife Rebecca, appeared in The Leading Edge. He followed it up with several more stories, often in anthologies, as well as in Analog. Five of his stories were collected in the collection High Heeled Distraction.

Producer Glen A. Larson (b.1937) died on November 15. Larson created the original Battlestar Galactica, The Six Million Dollar Man, and Knight Rider. Some of his non-genre shows included Quincy, M.E. and Magnum, P.I..

Scottish bookseller Russell Aitkin died on November 21. Aitkin opened Obelisk books in Glasgow in the 1980s and specialized in selling used science fiction and mysteries.

Author Kris Jensen (b.1953) died on November 21. Jensen published the Ardel trilogy in the 1990s, including FreeMaster, Mentor, and Healer.

Film historian Walt Lee (b.1931) died on November 23, after a battle with Alzheimer’s. Lee published the three volume Reference Guide to Fantastic Films between 1972 and 1975, for which he was award a Worldcon Special Convention Award at Aussiecon.

Author and screenwriter John Tomerlin (b.1930) died on November 25. Tomerlin wrote several episodes of The Twilight Zone, including “Number 12 Looks Like You,” as well as the novel The High Tower. He co-wrote the novel Run from the Hunter with Charles Beaumont.

Fan artist Stu Shiffman (b.1954) died on November 26. Shiffman won a Best Fan Artist Hugo in 1990. From 1999 until 2014, he served as a judge for the Sidewise Awards for Alternate History. Shiffman suffered a stroke two years ago and had been recovering before a fall earlier this year. Earlier this year, he married long-time companion Andi Shechter.

Author P. D. James (b.1920) died on November 27. Best known as a detective novelist, in 1992, James published the apocalyptic novel Children of Men, which was turned into a film.

New Zealand author Rocky Wood (b.1959) died on December 1. Wood was one of the world’s foremost experts on the writings of Stephen King, publishing at least five volumes on King’s works and collecting. Wood worked as a researcher for King on King’s novel Doctor Sleep. Wood was currently serving as the President of the Horror Writers Association and had been diagnosed with ALS in 2010.

Ralph H. Baer (b.1922) died on December 6. Baer is best known for creating the Magnavox Odyssey, widely regarded as the first home video game console, in the 1960s. The unit went on sale in 1972. He also created the first light gun, which was the first peripheral for a home video game. In the late 70s, he helped develop the game Simon. Baer was born in Germany and was expelled from school at 11 due to his Jewish ancestry. His family fled Germany in 1938.

British fan Lesley Hatch (b.1954) died on December 6. Hatch belonged to the Prophecy APA from its first issue and wrote for the SCIS fanzine Inception. From 1998 to 2005, Hatch reviewed books for Vector.
Artist Roy Scarfo (b.1926) died on December 8 from pancreatic cancer. Scarfo worked as the creative art director for GE’s Space Technology Center and also was a space art consultant for NASA, Sun, the Department of Defense, and other organizations. His own art focused on interplanetary travel and space colonization. In 1978, 35 of his paintings were exhibited at the International Space Hall of Fame as “Beyond Tomorrow.”

Author Donald Moffitt (b.1931) died on December 10. Moffitt began publishing science fiction in 1960 with the publication of his story “The Devil’s Due.” His first SF novel, The Jupiter Theft, was published in 1977 and was followed in 1986 with Genesis Quest and Second Genesis. In addition to writing science fiction, Moffitt published thrillers under the pseudonym Paul Kenyon.

Spanish editor Francisco Porrúa (b.1922) died on December 18. Porrúa founded the Minotauro science fiction press and published Spanish translations of The Lord of the Rings, The Left Hand of Darkness, and The Martian Chronicles. Porrúa was also instrumental in getting Gabriel García Márquez’s novel Cien años de soledad published and recognized.

Author Roberta Leigh (b.Rita Shulman, 1926) died on December 19. She wrote romance novels and children’s novels, eventually writing and creating puppet TV shows in Britain, including Space Patrol and the less successful Paul Starr and The Solarnauts.

Author Robert San Souci (b.1946) died on December 19. San Souci collected many folk tales from around the world and published them in editions aimed at children. He was hired by Disney to serve as a consultant for the film Mulan.

Ohio fan Nick Winks (b.1949) died on December 20. Winks was an active convention runner, running children’s programming for various Marcons, Windycons, and Chicon 2000 and also working on Context. Winks held the rank of Admiral in Barfleet. He leaves behind his wife, fan Linda Winks.

Author Robert Conroy (b.1938) died on December 30, succumbing to thymus cancer. Conroy began publishing with the novel 1901 in 1995, and returned to publishing in 2006 with several alternate histories, including 1862, 1945, and 1920: America’s Greatest War, among others. His works were frequently nominated for the Sidewise Award, and Conroy won the award for his 2009 novel, 1942.

2015

Author Kate Gilmore died during the first week of January. Gilmore is the author of the young adult novels Enter Three Witches, The Exchange Student, and The Caverns of Kwandalin. Gilmore didn’t begin publishing until she was 50.

French author Michel Jeury (b.1934) died on January 9. Jeury began publishing as Albert Higon in 1960 with the novels Aux Étoiles du Destin and La Machine du Pouvoir, the latter of which won the 1960 Prix Jules Verne. In the early 1970s, he published Chronolysis and continued to write science fiction into the 1980s, publishing nearly twenty books as part of the Anticipation line before turning his attention to mainstream fiction.

Editor Alice K. Turner (b.1940) died on January 16 from pneumonia. Turner had served as the fiction editor at Playboy from 1980 until 2000. In 1998, she edited The Playboy Book of Science Fiction, collecting 25 science fiction stories originally published in Playboy by authors including William Tenn, Ray Bradbury, Doris Lessing, and Ursula K. Le Guin.

San Francisco fan Eric P. Scott died in the middle of January. Scott entered fandom around 1980 and attended every Westercon beginning with 1981, eventually helping to run the con-suite. He was an active party thrower at conventions and tried to raise the level of parties by example. He was active in BASFA and also worked on programming, green room, and art shows at various conventions.

Fan and librarian Mary Axford died on January 26. Axford chaired DeepSouthCon 23 in 1985 with Richard Gilliam and was active in a variety of areas of con-running. She spent 26 years as a librarian at Georgia Tech.

Author and linguist Suzette Haden Elgin (b.Patricia Anne Wilkins, 1936) died on January 27. Elgin began publishing in 1969 with the story “For the Sake of Grace” and followed it a year later with the novel The Communipaths. She may be best known for the Native Tongue trilogy. In 1978, she founded the Science Fiction Poetry Association, and their Elgin Award is named in her honor.

Fan John Jones died on February 3. Jones was instrumental in running RavenCon in Virginia. He came to science fiction through super hero shows in the 1970s and began volunteering at Vulkon in the 1990s. He served as head of Operations at Wrath of Con in 2008 and since 2009 has been the vice chair of RavenCon.

Author Melanie Tem (b.1949) died on February 9. Tem was married to her frequent collaborator, Steve Rasnic Tem. Her novels included Prodigal, Desmodus, and Black River, and she wrote Daughters with her husband and Making Love and Witch-Light with Nancy Holder. Prodigal won the Bram Stoker Award for best debut novel and “The Man on the Ceiling,” co-written with her husband, received the Bram Stoker, World Fantasy Award, International Horror Guild, and Awards.

Irish fan Mick O’Connor died on February 16. O’Connor became active in fandom in the 1990s when he began attending meetings of the Irish Science Fiction Association. O’Connor also ran a comic book shop in Dublin and was part of the current Dublin in 2019 Worldcon bid.

Author Carol Severance (b.1944) died on February 19. Severance was the author of The Island Warrior trilogy and the Compton Crook Award winning Reefsong. Her novels tended to use the Pacific Islands as their background and Severance did anthropological fieldwork in the remote coral atolls of Micronesia and eventually settled in Hawaii.

Actor Leonard Nimoy (b.1931) died on February 27. Nimoy was best known for his role as Mr. Spock in the original Star Trek, as well as the movies based on the series. He also directed the films Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. In addition to his work on Star Trek, Nimoy was the long-time host of In Search of… and appeared in such films as Zombies of the Stratosphere and Them!. Prior to appearing on Star Trek, Nimoy had a recurring role on Sea Hunt. He appeared in episodes The Outer Limits and The Twilight Zone.

Author Sir Terry Pratchett (b.1948) died on March 12 surrounded by his family. For the past several years, Sir Terry has suffered from Alzheimer’s. Pratchett is best known for the long-running Discworld novels, but has also been co-authoring the Long Earth series with Stephen Baxter. His other works include The Nome Trilogy, Johnny and the Dead, and Good Omens, written with Neil Gaiman. In addition to his knighthood, Pratchett has won the Andre Norton Award, the BSFA Award, the Skylark, World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award, and others.

Danish author Inge Erikson (b.1935 ) died on March 13. Erikson began publishing science fiction in 1980 with the play The Wind Is Not for Sale and wrote the novel Amanda Screamer’s Desire two years later. Her “Space Without Time” series is comprised of four novels and was published between 1983 and 1989. Prior to writing science fiction, Erikson wrote mainstream fiction and returned to that in the 1990s.

Danish author Ib Melchior (b.1917) died on March 13. Melchior wrote the short story “The Racer,” which was the basis for the films Death Race 2000 and Death Race. His other short stories included “Vidiot” and “The Winner and New…” In addition to two novels, he wrote screenplays for Robinson Crusoe on Mars, Journey to the Seventh Planet, and two episodes of the Hugo-nominated Men Into Space.

Bookseller Ted Ball died on March 18. Ball was the co-owner of London’s Fantasy Centre, a SF/fantasy bookstore Ball opened in 1969 with Dave Gibson and which closed in 2009.

Fan Peggy Rae Sapienza (b.Peggy Rae McKnight, 1944 ) died on March 22, about a month after undergoing heart surgery. Peggy Rae, who was married to Bob Pavlat from 1963-1983 and to John Sapienza from 1999 until her death, chaired Bucconeer, the 1998 Worldcon. She was long active in con-running and fanzine publishing. She was a driving force behind much of Washington and Baltimore fandom, and has chaired or co-chaired several recent Nebula Award Weekends. She helped create the modern exhibition concourse at Worldcons and in 2012, she was the fan guest of honor at Chicon 7.

Hugo nominee Karl Alexander (b.1945 ) died in late March. Alexander was nominated for the Hugo for the film Time After Time, which was based on his novel of the same name. He also wrote a sequel, Jaclyn the Ripper. Most of Alexander’s work in Hollywood was as a gaffer and electrician.

Author Patrick H. Adkins (b.1948 ) died on April 7. In 1974, Adkins, a lifelong fan of Edgar Rice Burroughs, published Edgar Rice Burroughs Bibliography and Price Guide. His first novel, Lord of the Crooked Paths, the first in a trilogy, appeared in 1987. In 2001, he published the collection Forgotten Tales of Love and Murder of uncollected Burroughs stories through the Tarzana Project, which he founded with John H. Guidry. He also served as editor of the New Orleans SF Association fanzine NOLAZine.

Artist Herb Trimpe (b.1939) died on April 13. Trimpe worked on The Incredible Hulk in the 1960s and 70s and became the first person to draw Wolverine for publication. He drew for several other Marvel publications, including Captain America and The Defenders. In 2002, he won an Inkpot Award as well as a The Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award for work he did as a chaplain at the World Trade Center following the September 11 attacks.

Fan Art Widner (b.1917) died on April 17. Widner, who often signed his correspondence as R. Twidner, was one of the founding members of The Stranger Club, the pioneers of Boston fandom, and chaired Boskones I and II. He published more than 160 fanzines, including YHOS from 1940-45 and 1979-2001. He received the Big Heart Award in 1989 and was the 1991 DUFF winner. Widner received a Retro Hugo nomination for 1946 in the Best Fan Writer category and, along with The Stranger Club, was the Worldcon Fan GoH at Noreascon 3. Widner was also an inductee into the First Fandom Hall of Fame.

Fan Steve M. Cohen (b.1957) died on April 20. Cohen was a long-time comics fan. Cohen was exceptionally knowledgable about both comics books and comic arts. He had been suffering from respiratory issues for several years.

Fan Stan Burns (b.Marsdon Stanford Burns, Jr., 1947) died on April 23. Burns began reading science fiction in 1957, when his mother got him a copy of Heinlein’s Have Space Suit, Will Travel from the library. He became active in LASFS while working on a cultural anthropology paper in 1967 and began attending conventions. Burns was the official photographer at Equicon, Filmcon, LACons I and III, many Loscons.

Fan Kathy Doran Owen died on April 25. Owens lived in Alabama was was active in developing and running the literary programming track at DragonCon for the past several years.

Danish author Jannick Storm (b. Finn Jannick Storm Jørgensen, 1939) died on May 9. Storm worked as a critic, translator, and editor as well as an author. He helped reintroduce science fiction to Denmark in the 50s and edited a line of translations beginning in 1968. his own fiction is collected in Miriam og andre and Er mao død.

Artist Glen Orbik (b.1963) died on May 11 following a battle with cancer. Orbik studied art at the California Art Institute and later with Fred Fixler. His artwork adorned video games, novels, and comics, including works by Stephen King, Ray Bradbury, Joe Lansdale, and Barbara Hambly.

Artist James R. Powell (b.1972) died in a car accident on May 13. Powell painted the cover for the anthology Denizens of Darkness, several Joe Lansdale novels, as well as works by Neil Gaiman, Michael Moorcock, and Brian Hodge. He created the badge art for the 2015 World Horror Con, which was held the weekend before his death.

Fan Yvonne “Vonnie” Carts-Powell (b.1966) died on May 22. Carts-Powell was a frequent attendee and panelist at Boston area conventions and has written reviews for Green Man Reviews. A science writer, in 2008, she wrote The Science of Heroes, a look at the television series. She was diagnosed with cancer in 2013.

Author Tanith Lee (b.1947) died on May 24. Lee began publishing with the short story “Eustace” in 1968. She went on to write numerous novels, including the five volume “Tales From The Flat Earth” sequence, the Birthgrave trilogy, and “The Secret Books of Paradys” sequence. She was nominated for the Nebula twice, for Birthgrave and “Red As Blood,” as well as numerous World Fantasy and British Fantasy nominations, becoming the first woman to win the British Fantasy Award for Best Novel for Death’s Master. She won back-to-back World Fantasy Best Short Story Awards in 1983 and 1984 and received that organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013.

Bookseller and publisher Chuck Miller (b.1953) died on May 24. Miller ran a used bookstore in Pennsylvania before teaming up with Tim Underwood to found the publishing company Underwood-Miller in 1976. The two published several books, beginning with a reprint of Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth before disbanding the company in 1994. Their final project was another reissue of The Dying Earth. They also published works by L. Sprague de Camp, Harlan Ellison, and Philip K. Dick. Miller self-published the novel Blood of the Centipede in 2012.

Doris Elaine Sauter died around May 25. Sauter met Philip K. Dick in 1972 and struck up a friendship with him that lasted until his death. After Dick died, Sauter edited What If Our World Is Their Heaven? The Final Conversations of Philip K. Dick, which was ranked fourth in the Locus Poll in 2002.

Canadian author and editor Joël Champetier (b.1957) died on May 30. Champetier’s first story, “Le chemin des fleurs” appeared in Solaris in 1981 and his first novel, La mer au fond du monde appeared in 1990. In 1983, he helped organize the first Boréal Congress and was on the board of directors for several years. Beginning in 1990, he held various positions at Solaris and was managing editor at the time of his death.

Fan Michael Wernig (b.1954) died on June 3. Wernig was a member of the Albuquerque Science Fiction Society and a frequent attendee at Bubonicon.

Actor Christopher Lee (b.1922) died on June 7. Lee portrayed numerous iconic genre roles beginning with Count Dracula, but also Saruman, Count Dooku, Flay, DEATH, Scaramanga, Rochefort, and many more. Lee won several Lifetime Achievement Awards including the Saturns, Empire, SFX, and Bram Stoker.

German author Wolfgang Jeschke (b.1936) died on June 10. Jeschke discovered German science fiction fandom in the 1950s and in 1955 became one of the first members of Science Fiction Club Deutschland. His early stories were published in fanzines, but he eventually went on to work in publishing as an editor as well as write his own novels, including Der letzte Tag der Schöpfung and Midas oder Die Auferstehung des Fleisches. Jeschke was one of the Pro Guests of Honor at ConFiction, the 1990 Worldcon held in The Hague.

Philadelphia and Charleston fan Sandy Swank (b.Gregory A. Swank, 1959) died on June 13. Swank served as President of the Greater Delaware Valley Costumers Guild and was also active in the SCA. In May 2015, Swank, along with his husband, Rob Himmelsbach, co-chaired CostumeCon 33 in Charleston, SC. Swank was active in living history education as well.

Seattle area fan Bruce E. Durocher II (b.1959) died on June 14. Durocher ran videos and film for the 2005 NASFIC, Cascadia Con, and was active in Seattle fandom. A film fan and reviewer, he was married to artist Margaret Organ-Kean.

Phil Austin (b.1941) died on June 18. Austin was the one constant member of The Firesign Theatre, founding the troupe with David Ossman, Peter Bergman, and Phil Proctor. Austin provided the voice for the character Nick Danger, one of the troupes most famous creations. He (and the rest of the group) were twice nominated for the Hugo Award for their comedy albums Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me the Pliers (1970) and I Think We’re All Bozos on This Bus (1971).

Artist and musician Colin Cameron died on June 19.  Cameron was an active fan artist in the 60s and eventually became a musician in Hollywood, performing on the soundtracks to such films as Moonraker, Phantom of the Paradise, and The Muppet Movie.

Scientist Claudia Alexander (b.1959) died on July 11.  Alexander worked for the US Geological Survey and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, serving as the last project manager for the Galileo mission.  In addition to her work as a scientist, Alexander published steampunk stories and was active in steampunk costuming.

Author Tom Piccirilli (b.1965) died on July 11 after a battle with cancer. Piccirrilli wrote the novels Dark Father, Headstone City, and The Night Class, the last of which won the Bram Stoker Award. He won two more Stoker Awards for poetry collections, one for his short story “The Misfit Child Grows Fat on Despair” and a fifth for his work The Devil’s Wine.

Fan Anne Morrel died on July 17.  Morrel was active in LASFS and participated in many of the club’s projects.  She attended many Los Angeles area conventions. 

Author and costumer Adrienne Martine-Barnes (b.1942) died on July 20. Barnes published her first short story in 1982 and followed up with her first novel the same year. She collaborated with Marion Zimmer Bradley on three Darkover novels, with Diana L. Paxson on the Chronicles of Fionn mac Cumhal trilogy, and published the Chronique D’Avebury trilogy on her own. She was the first Queen of the East Kingdom in the Society for Creative Anachronism. In 1979, Martine-Barnes attempted, but failed, to create Costume-Mania, a costuming weekend, but her vision eventually launched Costume-Con 1 in 1983.

Author E. L. Doctorow (b.1931) died on July 21. Not particularly known as a genre author, in 1976, Doctorow was nominated for the Nebula Award for his novel Ragtime, which would eventually be turned into a Broadway musical.

Filker Renee Alper (b.1957) died on July 27. In 1977, Alper founded The American Hobbit Association, almost single-handedly running the organization for 12 years. She also was the dramaturge for Ovation Theatre Company’s adaptations of The Lord of the Rings over a three year period. She has twice been nominated for the Pegasus Award and has produced several filk albums, including Wheelchair in High Gear and Thoracic Park. Alper won or placed in the OVFF Songwriting Contest a dozen times.

Fan Margaret Ford Keifer (b.1921) died on July 28. Keifer’s husband, Ben, was one of the founders of MidWestCon, and Keifer is the only person to have attended all 66 MidWestCons. A founding member of the Cincinnati Fan Group, Keifer was one of the administrators of the Don Ford Fund, named after her first husband, the chairman of Cinvention, which raised money to bring Jack Speer to Ditto 14/Fanhistoricon 11.